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"Cools and calms the skin, relieving the symptoms of chickenpox"

When kids need something to soothe the itch of chickenpox, PoxClin™ CoolMousse can provide relief from skin irritation, itching, burning and sensitivity associated with chickenpox.

 

PoxClin™ CoolMousse for children with chickenpox:

 

  Itch and burn relief

  Cooling and soothing effect

  Conditions and protects the skin

  Promotes healing

  No harmful chemicals or toxic substances1

 

What are the symptoms of chickenpox?

In children the rash is often the first sign of disease.2

The rash is itchy with small, fluid-filled blisters.3

 

Other signs and symptoms, which may appear one to two days before the rash, include: 3

 

•  Fever

•  Loss of appetite

•  Headache

•  Tiredness and a general feeling of being unwell (malaise)

 

Once the chickenpox rash appears, it goes through three phases: 3

 

  Raised pink or red bumps (papules), which break out over several days

  Small fluid-filled blisters (vesicles), forming from the raised bumps about one day before breaking and leaking

  Crusts and scabs, which cover the broken blisters and take several more days to heal

 

How do you get chickenpox?

The infection is caused by the varicella zoster virus (VZV).2

Infection with VZV occurs through the respiratory tract.2

The most common mode of transmission is by person to person from infected respiratory tract secretions.2

Vaccination with the chickenpox vaccine is the best way to prevent chickenpox3, although breakthrough infections do occur even in vaccinated individuals.2

 

Can chickenpox be serious?

Although chickenpox is normally a mild disease, it can be serious and lead to complications, especially in high-risk people, including:3

 

  Newborns and infants whose mothers never had chickenpox or the vaccine

  Adults

  Pregnant women who haven’t had chickenpox

  People whose immune systems are impaired by medication, such as chemotherapy, or another disease, such as cancer or HIV

  People who are taking steroid medications for another disease or condition, such as children with asthma

  People taking drugs that suppress their immune systems

 

A common complication of chickenpox is a bacterial infection of the skin.3

Chickenpox may also lead to dehydration, pneumonia, inflammation of the brain (encephalitis), toxic shock syndrome, or Reye’s syndrome (for people who take aspirin during chickenpox).3

 

When is chickenpox contagious?

A person who has chickenpox can transmit the virus for up to 48 hours before the tell-tale rash appears.3

This period of being infectious extends through the first 4 to 5 days, or until the lesions have formed crusts.2

Chickenpox is highly contagious to people who haven’t had the disease or been vaccinated against it.3

 

Treatment of chickenpox

In otherwise healthy children, chickenpox typically requires no medical treatment.3 For the most part the disease is allowed to run its course.

 

There is no published evidence available to support the use of calamine to alleviate itching in varicella infection (grade D).4

 

What is PoxClin™ CoolMousse?

  PoxClin™ CoolMousse has been developed to provide relief from skin irritation, itching, burning and sensitivity associated with chickenpox

 

  Spreading thick substances such as creams and ointments can result in bursting of blisters. PoxClin™ CoolMousse is easy to spread1 causing little friction over sensitive areas

 

•  PoxClin™ CoolMousse delivers a cooling effect to the skin, which alleviates the itch considerably1

 

  PoxClin™ CoolMousse contains 2QR, a Bio-Active Bacterial Blocker derived from the Aloe barbadensis plant – it binds to harmful bacteria from the    environment, thereby protecting the skin from attack1

 

Video: https://youtu.be/MmTIl4I3chw?list=PL4UQDJQUIPUiJL2F0XA-8Fd4XhkOWwBRv

 

Disclaimer: By clicking on the above link you are leaving the Actor Pharma website.

 

Advantages of Poxclin™ CoolMousse with 2QR Bio-Active Blocker

How to use PoxClin™ CoolMousse

For treatment of large surfaces of the skin infected with chickenpox:

 

   Shake the bottle before use. When first using PoxClin™ CoolMousse, two to three pumps of the foam dispenser

     may be needed for the foam to emerge

 

   Apply at least 3 times a day or whenever relief is required

 

   Apply a generous amount and gently dab into the skin

 

For prevention of scarring:1

 

    Frequent application of the mousse may enhance its effect

 

   PoxClin™ CoolMousse provides relief from itchiness and protects the skin, resulting in less scratching and fewer infections

 

  It is recommended to apply the mousse prior to change of clothing, or whenever relief is required

 

PoxClin™ CoolMousse is a light, smooth mousse and is quickly and easily absorbed by the skin.

 

For added cooling relief, PoxClin™ CoolMousse can be stored in the fridge.

 

You should consult a doctor or healthcare professional if your child’s condition worsens or does not improve.

 

For more information please refer to the product Patient Information Leaflet or ask your doctor or pharmacist.

 

 

Related Information:

 

   PoxClin™ CoolMousse Patient Information Leaflet

 

  PoxClin™ CoolMousse - Frequently Asked Questions

 

    For more information, go to http://www.poxclin.com/

 

Disclaimer: By clicking on the above link you are leaving the Actor Pharma website.

 

 

References:

 

1.    PoxClin CoolMousse. Available from: http://www.poxclin.com/int/products/poxclin-coolmousse.aspx

 

2.   Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Varicella. In: Atkinson W, et al, eds. Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine Preventable Diseases.

Tenth Edition, Washington DC, Public Health Foundation, 2007.

 

3.    Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. 2008. Chickenpox. Available from:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chickenpox/home/ovc-20191271

 

4.    Tebruegge M, Kuruvilla M, Margarson I. Does the use of calamine or antihistamine provide symptomatic relief from pruritis in children with

 varicella zoster infection? Article on file.